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Le Lion Et Le Moucheron Illustration Essay

1960 A Bedtime Treasury of Children's Stories. Edited and with an introduction by Margaret C. Farquhar. Compiled by Oscar Weigle. Illustrated by Ann Wolf, Crosby Newell, William Wiesner, Art Krusz, Irma Wilde. NY: Grosset & Dunlap. $3.50 at Bluestem, Lincoln, NE, Dec., '92. Extra copy for $3 from Second Chance, April, '93.

A nice fat book on cheap paper with lots of different kinds of stories. Very simple monochrome art. Thirteen fables are given together on 85-98; they all come from Little Folk's Fables from Aesop by McLoughlin (1940). Each here but one ("The Mice in Council") gets one page and one illustration. Four other fables follow later: TMCM (360), TT (417), "The Gold in the the Orchard" (420), and "The Larks in the Cornfield" (428). "The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing" (85) is told differently: the wolf tries to make his voice sound like that of a lamb, and his voice wakes up the dog. TMCM is also different: the mice trade visits to see who is better off. The country mouse is caught and tells the cat a tale. Multi-colored end-papers have art that is smaller but better for TMCM and TT. It would be hard to hate any book that ends with "The Young Lady from Niger"!

1960 Aesop with a Smile. Ernestine Cobern Beyer. Drawn by Vee Guthrie. First edition. Dust jacket. Hardbound. Printed in USA. Chicago: The Reilly & Lee Co. $35.00 from Sister Brute Books, Stockton, CA, Sept. ,'98.

Red cloth boards. Nineteen fables on 48 pages. Witty rhyming-couplet versions for children. In "The Lioness" Mrs. Rabbit claims "at least twenty-two" children. "(You see, though I have a far greater amount,/Twenty-two is as high as I know how to count)" (8). The ant pitied the grasshopper "But he died before she'd time to bid him stay" (11). Country mouse Timmy had scarcely hung up his hat in town when he scented a cat and left (15). Guthrie goes a step further than the text in WS when the traveller is pictured in a body of water (19). A mischievous breeze blows out the boastful candle on purpose (24). This text pits a pine against the reed (25). Among the best of Guthrie's black-and-white illustrations are those of the sleeping hare (28) and the crane's legs at the fox's door (32). Beyer has the father frog in OF say "I'll equal that monster or bust" and adds, with italics, "And he did!" (36).

1960 Aesop's Fables. Told by Valerius Babrius. Translated by Denison B. Hull. Decorations by Rainey Bennett. Clear plastic dust jacket. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. $10 at Constant Reader, Jan., '91. Extra copy of the hardbound for $7 from Jackson Street, October, '94.

The decorations are just that There is no intent to involve narrative in the picture. The rhyming verses are pleasing and not overly long--e.g., on the 2W. It might be fun to work Babrius into a lecture as a particular kind of story teller.

1960 Aesop's Fables. Told by Valerius Babrius. Translated by Denison B. Hull. Decorations by Rainey Bennett. Paperbound. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. From unknown sources, July, '83.

The decorations are just that There is no intent to involve narrative in the picture. The rhyming verses are pleasing and not overly long--e.g., on the 2W. It might be fun to work Babrius into a lecture as a particular kind of story teller. This copy, which sold for $2.95, was apparently a 1977 printing. See "1960/74" for a different printing at a different price. 

1960 Aesop's Fables: The Dog in a Manger. Edna Johnson. Illustrated by Stanley J. Woods. Paperbound. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. £ 3 from The London Bookworm, through choosebooks.com, Sept., '06.

This sixteen-page pamphlet seems to be in a series with Aesop's Fables: The Wolf and the Dog, for which I had guessed a publication date of 1950. Both use Caxton's text. The telling of the fable is straightforward. The simple illustrations alternate between beige-and-blue duotone and black-and-white. They serve the story well. The story itself is unusually drawn out. The dog goes through several activities, including first confronting a dog threatening to eat his food and later blocking the cows at the barn door. This pamphlet was previously owned by the Ilford Committee for Education, with a connection to Downshall Infants' School Seven Kings. Now the question I asked about the first booklet comes back: Might there be still others in a series with this booklet?

1960 Belling the Cat and Other Stories. Retold by Leland B. Jacobs. Illustrated by Harold Berson. A Golden Beginning Reader. NY: Golden Press. $3 at Renaissance, June, '96. Extra copy for $.85 at Cameron's, Portland, Aug., '87.

A small-format kids' book also including "The Little Red Hen" and "The Rabbit's Mistake." I like this cat with yellow eyes and red fez. A nice text for children. Five pages on BC.

1960    Cinderella Hassenpfeffer and Other Tales Mein Grossfader Told.  Dave Morrah. Fourteenth printing.  Hardbound.  NY: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.  See 1946/60.

1960 Danny Kaye's Around the World Story Book. Various illustrators. NY: Random House. $4.95 in NY, Jan., '90.

A delightful book, with some wonderful illustrations and lots of well told stories. The U.S. is represented in part by four funny stories from Bierce (21) with fine illustrations. Three from Aesop (97) are told loosely after Caxton and James. "The Shade of the Donkey" is presented on 198 as Chinese.

1960 De fabelwereld. Samengesteld en ingeleid door Halbo C. Kool. Pen-and-ink drawings by Alfons van Heusden? Dust jacket. Amsterdam: N.V. de Arbeiderspers. $7.50 at De Slegte, Dec., '88.

Good representative collection in Dutch of Dutch and other fabulists, including, e.g., plenty of Ambrose Bierce. The lively sketches include "The Blind and the Lame" (76), "The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing" (138), and "The Donkey and the Dog" (168).

1960 Der Wolf und das Pferd: Deutsche Tierfabeln des 18. Jahrhunderts. Herausgegeben von Karl Emmerich. Mit sieben Kupfern von Grandville und Chodowiecki. Hardbound. Dust jacket. Erste Auflage. Berlin: Verlag Rütten & Loening. DM 12 from Dresdener Antiquariat, Dresden, August, '01. Extra copy without a dust-jacket for DM 35 from Bücherwurm, Heidelberg, July, '98.  

Here is a nicely put together East German anthology of German fables of the eighteenth century. One of its first curiosities is that the spine says only "Der Wolf und das Pferd," while the cover says only "Deutsche Tierfabeln des 18. Jahrhunderts." Emmerich writes a long introduction (5-24). I find twenty-six fabulists here. Those with the largest representation include Hagedorn, Gellert, Lichtwer, Lessing, Kazner, Pfeffel, and Fischer.

1960 Enid Blyton's Aesop's Fables. Retold by Enid Blyton. Pictures by Grace Lodge. First printing. Paperbound. Edinburgh & London: Enid Blyton Little Story Books, #21; "Old Thatch" Series: W. & A.K. Johnston & G.W. Bacon, Ltd. £2.99 from Fiona McIntosh, Pershore, Worcestershire, UK, through eBay, Oct., '06.

The existence of this little book surprised and surprises me. I already have two editions of Aesop's fables by Blyton. They are listed under "1925?" and "1999". There seems to be no relation between those texts and these. Here, for example, MSA is told without any reference to the miller's wife (6). Thre are thirteen fables on 62 pages. This small (4¾" x 6¼") booklet lacks its back paper cover and is fragile.

1960 Ésope: Fables. Texte établi et traduit par Émile Chambry. Deuxième Edition. Paperbound. Collection des Universités de France publiée sous le patronage de l' Association Guillaume Budé. Paris: Societé d' Édition "Les Belles Lettres." See 1927/60.

1960 Fables and Fantasias. By Jerome Salzmann. Illustrated by the author. #141 of 150 copies. NY: The Ron Press. $35 from Oak Knoll, Nov., '92.

Critical and thoughtful little fables mixed in with other materials. Salzmann should be included in a survey of recent fable humorists. Some of the fables risk being intellectually cute. There are nice designs along the way. Among the best are "The Fortunate Elephant" (#1), "The Twins of Destiny" (pleasure and pain, #7), "The Eclipse" (#13), "Doom on the Moon" (typical, #23), "The Flight of the Moth" (#30), "The Decline of the Devil" (à la Bierce, #33), and "M. Polo & Co." (#34).

1960 Fables de la Chine Antique, Tome II. Illustrations de Fong Tse-kai. Hardbound. Peking: Editions en Langues Etrangeres. $12 from Second Story Books, Rockville, MD, Jan., '11.

This book is half of the larger-format canvas-bound predecessor of the identically named paperback book I have listed under "1980/84." The first text here is on 79 there. The order of texts changes slightly from time to time. The illustrations are the same. The cover picture here is the mirror-opposite of the cover picture there: a man sits before a fire over which a spitted turtle is roasting. There is a curious difference in names, whether of people or places. Thus "L'Homme Qui Avait Peur des esprits" (3) starts there "Au sud de Xiashu vivait un homme nommé Juan Shuliang." The author is listed as Xunsi. Here, some twenty years earlier, the sentence reads "Au sud de Sciacheou vivait un homme nommé Kiuan Siun-liang." The author is listed as Siun Tse. Here the title is pasted onto the gray paper cover in a lovely vertical red stripe. See my comments there and in the paperback Spanish and English versions of the book.

1960 Fables de La Fontaine. Illustrations de (W.) Cremonini. Hardbound. Milano: Albums Cristal: Editions Fabbri. 160 Francs from a Buchinist, July, '01.

This book, along with a larger-format book of the same title by the same artist and publisher one year later, must be involved in some curious history. This book is almost 10" by almost 10½". Did Editions Fabbri produce one set of books in this format--"Albums Cristal"--one year and then create a new series with new art in a different format just one year later? Perhaps the later work was not a member of a series. In any case, three of the nineteen fables there are among the ten fables here, with different illustrations: TH, TMCM, and AD. Among the best of some very good illustrations here are those showing the eagle and a lamb (5), the dead frog from OF (16), and the ant who was helped by the dove on 26. The versions of La Fontaine are in prose here; in the version of a year later they are in the original verse. It is easy for me to be enthusiastic about Cremonini's work. There may be two fables here that are not from La Fontaine. "Le Courage du Lievre" is about a rabbit who boasts that he has no fear--until a dog barks and the rabbit runs in terror. "Le Taureau et le Renard" is about a clever fox that gets rid of the insects on his body by putting a straw in his mouth and getting into the river. He descends further and further into the river, and the insects in his body move up to his head and then onto the straw. Once he has them all on the straw, he throws it far away.

1960 Fables de La Fontaine. Illustrations de Félix Lorioux. Hardbound. Beuchet et Vanden Brugge: Imprimerie Moderne de Nantes. $4.75 from Book House on Grand, July, '94.Extra copy for $2.50 from J. Crowley, Montclair, NJ, through eBay, Oct., '07.

Ten fables in a squarish hardbound edition that includes a colored illustration for each fable and some black-and-whites besides. This book seems a clear partial reprint in smaller format of of Marcus' 1949 edition with the same title. Notice that the books share the same printer: Beuchet et Vanden Brugge. The mystery here is that this book adds three fables that do not appear in the larger earlier work: "Le Coq & le Renard," "Le Coche et la Mouche," and DW. And the full-page illustration for TH is reversed. The partial-page colored illustrations there tend to become black-and-white here. Among the best colored illustrations here are those for GGE, "Le Coche et la Mouche" (even sharper on the book's back cover), FS, and "Le Héron." A very nice book. The bottom of the spine is wounded.Now, in 2008, I have a second copy with an even more wounded spine. I will use it particularly for shows to students, since it represents very good foreign art work and heavy usage of a book.

1960 Fables de La Fontaine. Précedées de la vie d'Ésope, accompagnées de notes nouvelles. Illustrations de Karl Girardet. Tours(?): Mame. See 1901/60.

1960 Fables de la Fontaine. Illustrations de Guy Sabran. Hardbound. Printed in France. Paris: La Bibliothèque Rouge et Bleue: Éditions G. P. $5 from Francine Juneau, Montreal, through Ebay, Oct., '02.

This is a large-format (10½" x 7¾") children's reader and picture-book of some 36 pages. It has experienced significant wear as a library book; it has a standard library hard-cover. It offers one or two lively, colorful, expressive illustrations for each of its twelve fables: GA, Le Coche et la Mouche, LM, AD, FC, WL, TH, Le Héron, Le Lion et le Moucheron, MM, TT, and TMCM. Some of the best of these show the frozen blue cicada on its back (7) and the huge rich wolf pitted against the simple lamb (17). The second picture for WL deals beautifully in shadow, with a drop of blood running from the wolf's mouth (18). A very pretty milkmaid looks upward while she is still balancing the pail on her head (30). The book is stamped "Retiré de la Collection de la Bibliothèque de la Ville de Montréal." I am delighted to have the book in its retirement.

1960 Fables de La Fontaine, No. 1.  Paperbound.  Livre-Disque: Philips.  $12 from Jean-Claude Côté, Remouald, Quebec, Canada, May, '15.

I already have two copies of this book and record,  Now I have found an earlier copy.  Two clues lead me to believe that it is earlier, and then  there is a strange anomaly I need to mention.  The two clues are that the paper used in the fable booklet is not the shiny paper used in the other two versions.  The second clue is that those other versions advertised Volumes 3 and 4 in this series.  This copy advertises Volume 2.  The anomaly is that this early copy appeals to a publishing law of 1960.  Those other copies appeal to an earlier publishing law in 1955.  I have put down 1960 as the date for this copy, since it is a firm terminus post quem.  Probably the date of those other two copies needs to be adjusted to be sometime after 1960.  As I wrote of them, here ten fables are shown and read by Yves-Gérard le Dantec.  A 45 rpm record is part of the package.  Monochrome and polychrome pages alternate.  The illustrations are lively if nothing else.  I will keep the book and record together among the books,

1960 Fables Mises en Vers, Tome I. Jean de La Fontaine; Texte établi et présenté par V.-L. Saulnier. Paperbound. Paris: Bibliothèque de Cluny: Librairie Armand Colin. $8 from Azio Media, Shallotte, NC, April, '11.

"Bibliothèque de Cluny" is a series of some fifty or sixty French and international classics. This is a standard paperback of the first six books of La Fontaine's fables, with an introduction at the beginning and notes, sources, models, and a T of C at the back of the book. No illustrations.

1960 Fables Mises en Vers, Tome II.  Jean de La Fontaine; Texte établi et présenté par V.-L. Saulnier.  Paperbound.  Paris: Bibliothèque de Cluny:  Librairie Armand Colin.  $15 from Ex Farrago Books, Portland, OR, March, '15.  

Persistence paid off in this case.  I had found the first volume of this two-volume set of paperbacks four years ago.  Now a second volume has turned up.  As I wrote then, "Bibliothèque de Cluny" is a series of some fifty or sixty French and international classics.  This is a standard paperback of the second six books of La Fontaine's fables, with its own introduction at the beginning and notes, variants, sources, several short essays, a bibliography, an AI for all twelve books, and a T of C for the last six books at the back of the book.   No illustrations.

1960 Fables in Slang and More Fables in Slang.  George Ade.  Illustrated by Clyde J. Newman.  E.F. Bleiler.  Paperbound.  NY: Dover.  See 1899/1960.

1960 Fables in Slang and More Fables in Slang. George Ade. Illustrated by Clyde J. Newman. Introduction by E.F. Bleiler. NY: Dover Publications. See 1899+1900/60.

1960 Fables, Tales, and Stories/A Captive in the Caucasus. (Cover: Fables, Tales, Stories after Lev Tolstoi.) L.N. Tolstoi. Compiled and adapted with Notes and Vocabulary by E. Vladimirsky and V. Zaitsev. Easy Russian Series. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House. $.75 at Second Story, May, '92.

A helpful little pamphlet. Pages 9-17 contain twelve "Fables and Tales," of which at least eight are Aesopic. The notes are helpful for identifying characters and stories. The limited vocabulary at the back is easier to work with than a whole dictionary. A nice little find.

1960 Four, Four, and Four/Fur, Fin, and Feather Fables. Philip White. Cover by Jim Spanfeller. Hardbound. Printed in USA. Richmond, VA: The Dietz Press. $4, Dec., '98.

The "fours" of the title refer to three sections of four fables each. Each fable gets one right-hand page for the combination of text and a simple black-and-white drawing. The fables are actually told as chreiai, anecdotes about named animals in particular places. Thus Ringtail the monkey lost his tail to a shark when he played one too many pranks on board ship and slipped overboard. These children's stories are simplistic and very correct. Thus a dog in Hawaii was named "Poki" (because he liked to poke his nose into strange places) by a newcomer to the islands who did not know that "poki" was a word for "cat." But the dog did not know it either, so the dog spent a happy life. Moral: "It doesn't matter what your name is as long as you are glad to be you." I do think this is the first time that I have heard of building a fire under a jackass to make him move! Tropical is written "trophical" and stubbornness "stubborness." I could not wait to finish this book!

1960 Happy Hours in Storyland. Volume 2 of The Bookshelf for Boys and Girls. Prepared under the Supervision of the Editorial Board of the University Society. NY: The University Society, Inc. See 1955/60.

1960 Hundertfünf Fabeln. Rudolf Kirsten. Hardbound. Zurich: Logos-Verlag. 20 CHF from Harteveld Rare Books, Fribourg, Switzerland, March, '07.

It is a joy to run into a book of clever fables and nothing else. These fables take on the challenge of the fable form well. I will cite some examples of good ones here. The eagle asked the peacock and the lark to check out the nightingale. When they returned, the peacock said that the look of her awful dress had so overwhelmed her that she did not even hear her song. The lark responded that her song had been so charming that she forgot to pay attention to her dress (10). The mouse said to the wounded eagle "Console yourself with us. We too cannot fly." The eagle answered "You do not know the longing for altitude" and died (11). The lazy dung-beatle says to the industrious ant "Your hard work has neither sense nor purpose. You will die just like me." The ant answers "Ask my posterity. And besides, there is a difference between dying as a dung-beatle and dying as an ant" (18). The rat-mother asks the attacking cat "How can you take my children, since you yourself are a mother?" The cat answers "Just for that reason. My kids love eating rat" (21). Fox, bear, and wolf pleaded with the lion to help them against a snake that they could not overcome. He did. As he lay exhausted and wounded, the three fell upon him and consumed him along with his victim (49). A frog tells the fly he has caught that the fly's sense and purpose is to be eaten. As then a stork consumes he frog, the frog screams "What injustice!" (63). "There are too many singers. No wonder that the many melodies produce only a lot of noise." So say all the birds, and each one thinks that the others need to be silent, so that people can hear only his voice. With a few exceptions, these fables come one to a page. I like them a great deal! T of C at the beginning.

1960 Jean de la Fontaine: Fables. #6323 of 8000. Hardbound. Printed in Switzerland. Lausanne: La Guilde du Livre. CHF 45 from Altstadt Antiquariat, Fribourg, Switzerland, through Advanced Book Exchange, Sept., '00.

This is, as one might expect, a spectacular volume for two things. First is the excellent binding. The original red leather has golden lettering on its pliable spine. The second curious feature lies in the pasted-in black-and-white engravings. I find it surprising that the source(s) of these is not acknowledged. Are these copies of famous illustrations of the fables? "The Ape and the Dolphin" is from Gouget; it is reproduced in McKendry (67). Might some or all of the others be from the same edition? I find about thirty-two illustrations after the oval frontispiece of La Fontaine. Among the best are these: "The Eagle and the Owl" (158), "The Young Widow" (184), "The Coach and the Fly" (204), and "The Acorn and the Pumpkin" (272). The illustration for "The Animal in the Moon" (219) is loose. The T of C at the end lists only books except for the individual fables in the appendix, but there is an AI right after it. This edition is too late for Bassy and does not appear in Bodemann.

1960 Jean de la Fontaine: Fables.  Gouget.  #2763 of 8000.  Hardbound.  Lausanne: La Guilde du Livre.  €20 from a Buchinist on the Seine, August, '14.  

In keeping with the policy of including in the collection all numbered, limited edition books, I include this second copy of a lovely book.  I will note two differences, one in the book itself and one in my understanding of the book.  First, let me repeat some comments made on the first copy.  This is, as one might expect, a spectacular volume for two things.  First is the excellent binding.  The original red leather has golden lettering on its pliable spine.  The second curious feature lies in the pasted-in black-and-white engravings.  Those engravings touch on the difference in my understanding.  I missed in the first copy the acknowledgement of the engravings of Gouget taken from the edition of Lecointe and Pougin from Paris in 1834, a copy of which has since then been acquired for this collection.   As I noted then, "The Ape and the Dolphin" is perhaps the most famous of the illustrations from Gouget; it is reproduced in McKendry (67).  I find about thirty-two illustrations after the oval frontispiece of La Fontaine.  Among the best are these: "The Eagle and the Owl" (158), "The Young Widow" (184), "The Coach and the Fly" (204), and "The Acorn and the Pumpkin" (272).  The difference in the two books themselves is this: the illustration for "The Animal in the Moon" (219) here is not loose, as it is in the other copy.  The T of C at the end lists only books except for the individual fables in the appendix, but there is an AI right after it.  This edition is too late for Bassy and does not appear in Bodemann.

1960 La Fontaine: Fables. Illustrations de André Jourcin. Hardbound. Paris: Collection Belles Lectures: Éditions Bias. See 1954/60.

1960 La Fontaine: Fables. Odette de Mourgues. First printing. Paperbound. Great Neck, NY: Barron's Studies in French Literature: Barron's Educational Series. $0.93 from an unknown source, June, '89.

This is an earlier paperback edition of a hardbound book I have in its 1967 edition from Edward Arnold. Its spine is losing its hold on the pages. I will add what I wrote there. This is a short and helpful little work, perhaps too taken with literary history, but it certainly helps us to hear something about that in assessing La Fontaine. Unfortunately, frequent French passages are not translated. De Mourgues wants to situate La Fontaine in history: that is a hard task because he stands out. There seems to be little around him. "He wrote at the time when French poetry offered the maximum advantages from the point of view of technique and of poetic traditions and the maximum difficulties from the point of view of subject-matter, themes, imagery and vocabulary" (8-9). La Fontaine's particular quality is maturity. Precieux poetry was the one kind of poetry alive when La Fontaine was writing: "poetry written for a group of sophisticated people in order to give them a delicate intellectual pleasure, without any danger of upsetting the peaceful civilized atmosphere of the group" (14). "The study of man is the basic subject of the Fables" (17). La Fontaine accepted the limitations which his age set on subject-matter. "Plaire et instruire" is not as easy as it may seem! "In real life men behave like animals" (20). "There is no pity, no security anywhere" (22). "The image of man which emerges from the general picture is that of a deceitful, greedy and cruel being" (23). The moralist is not primarily concerned with practical teaching, but his purpose is to see men and society as they are. He is not a reformer but he need not be a cynic. A moralist is necessarily a pessimist. The picture of politics and society in La F remains a general one, going far beyond his age. He shows no indignation, no bitterness. We watch the tragedy of the world from the point of view of the gods. But to this La Fontaine adds a rich blend of sympathy, tenderness, and irony. One last value enters this mix: solitude. Plaire: The fables are stories and most critics of La F have viewed him primarily as a story-teller. A first obvious characteristic of his poetry and story-telling is its naturalness. A second is wit. And for him wit is associated with serious and important subjects. There is a long section on poetic sacrifice. La Fontaine leaves out a lot that he knows that the reader needs to supply. Something classic about saying more with less. Critical analysis then of OR and "The Rat and the Oyster." There is a lot here in 62 pages.

1960 La Fontaine' in Masallari. Orhan Veli Kanik. Fourth printing?  Paperbound. Istanbul: Dogan Kardes Yayinlari. $20 from Alp Gencata, Istanbul, Turkey, through eBay, Jan., '05.

This is a simple, 64-page pamphlet with modest black-and-white illustrations in varying styles, perhaps borrowed from other editions. I like particularly the illustration of the hunter running from the lion, to the amusement of the shepherd (51). In DS (61), it is a bird that the dog has in his mouth, and we can see the bird that he sees in the water. The front cover ranges various anmals in color around the title against a yellow background. There is no T of C. 

1960 Les Fables de la Fontaine. Illustrations de C. Cambier. Paperbound. Paris: Albums - Puzzles Djeco: Djeco Éditeur. €12 from La Libre Errance, Marché Dauphine, Saint-Ouen, June, '09.

Here is a twelve-page book presenting two fables. Apparently there is a series of three books. One other volume in the series presents FC and OF, while another offers FS and "The Cat, the Weasel, and the Little Rabbit." In TMCM, after a full two-page colored spread presenting the city meal, there is a single page illustrating the disturbance in their meal. Facing this page is a black-and-white version of the same picture ready for coloring. Finally there is a connect-the-dots picture of the country mouse heading for home. For GA, there is first a lively single page presenting the singing cicada followed by a two-page colored spread of her pleading with the ant in winter. Perhaps the most colorful picture of the lot follows: the ant sends the cicada away. That picture is then repeated on the facing page in black-and-white for coloring. The final page is a connect-the-dots picture of the not-very-happy ant. A young former owner of this book has done the two connect-the-dots pictures. The back cover has an engaging picture of the cicada in her rags sitting on a log in a snowy scene, while the ant stands before the door and may be chastising her from a distance.

1960 Let's Learn To Read: Fables Retold.  Jenny Taylor and Terry Ingleby.  Illustrated by Esmé Eve.  Paperbound.  London/Glasgow: Story Reader 4:  Blackie and Son.  €.99 on eBay from hugo monkey, Gateshead, UK, July, '14.  

Here are ten well chosen stories, each with at least one two-color design.  "The Cock and the Dog"'; TH, "The Stag at the Pool"; OR, "The Wicked Cobbler"; FC' The Farmer and the Eagle"; SW; LM, and "The Woodcutter and His Axe."  Some of the fables presented here are represented on the cover, as in the image of the stag caught in the branches.  That is one of the better illustrations in the booklet (7).

1960 Midway, Number 4. A Magazine of Discovery in the Arts and Sciences. Editor: Felicia Anthenelli Holton. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. $7.50 from Turtle Island, Jan., '92.

This magazine issue contains Denison Hull's introduction to his 1960 Babrius translation modified as an article: "But Aesop Never Wrote a Thing!" (110-17), including translations of seven fables. There are deletions in the third paragraph and at the end of this short article, made presumably to adapt it to its new surroundings.

1960 Stories and Legends of Two Worlds. Based on Greek Mythology. By George Dorcheff. Illustrated by Stina Nagel. Dust jacket. NY: Exposition Press. $4 at Book Discoveries Nashville, April, '96. Extra copy without dust jacket for $2.75 at Chimney Sweep Books, Santa Cruz, Aug., '89.

A strange, talkative adaptation of Greek mythology to American mountain folklore, heavy on devils, guardian angels, and magic. There is no explanation of the background or method. Simple illustrations. SW (94) is vintage Aesop, but set in the Great Smoky Mountains. The traveller takes off all his clothes and jumps into a stream. "The Fox and the Turtle" (65) includes a variation of the traditional "The Fox and the Crab." Some stories are recognizable Greek myths; "The King Has Horns" is, for example, "Midas' Ears." The funniest is "The Old Lady and the Devil."

1960 Story Wagon. The Prose and Poetry Series. By Marjorie Pratt and Mary Meighen. Illustrated by Carol Critchfield. Syracuse: L.W. Singer. $6 at George Herget, New Orleans, Dec., '92. Extra copy for $1.50 at Renaissance, July, '88.

A children's book with enjoyable colored illustrations of MSA (84). The language is very simple. The ending is great: "Now--the man always walks, the boy always walks, the donkey always walks."

1960 Storyland Favorites. Harold G. Shane and Kathleen B. Hester. Illustrated by Mary Miller Salem. Second printing. Hardbound. River Forest, IL: Gateways to Reading Treasures Co-Basal Literary Readers: Laidlaw Brothers. $1.50 at the Antiquarium, Omaha, Nov., '89.

Here is a second printing of this book in only fair condition. As I wrote of the third printing from the same year, it has a lively and very simple second-grade reader in good shape with vintage 50's art that I like. Five fables. The mouse rides the lion's back out of the net as the hunters approach. " The Cat and the Milk " is their version of CP. SW makes the usual mistake about the bet, which proves who is better. Also TH and FC. A slip in this copy tells us that the book cost $1.59 then. It has not depreciated much in 35 years! 

1960 Storyland Favorites. Gateways to Reading Treasures Co-Basal Literary Readers. Harold G. Shane and Kathleen B. Hester. Illustrated by Mary Miller Salem. Third printing. River Forest, IL: Laidlaw Brothers. $2.25 at Grandma's House, Nebraska City, Nov., '94.

A lively and very simple second-grade reader in good shape with vintage 50's art that I like. Five fables. The mouse rides the lion's back out of the net as the hunters approach. "The Cat and the Milk" is their version of CP. SW makes the usual mistake about the bet, which proves who is better. Also TH and FC. A slip in the Antiquarium copy tells us that the book cost $1.59 then. It has not depreciated much in 35 years!

1960 The Bull with Magic Eyes and Other Chinese Fables. Retold by C.H. Kwock. Cover design by Edmon Yit Tom. First edition. Pamphlet. San Francisco: Jade Mountain Press. $5 from ellenbks, Cumberland, ME, through Ebay, Nov., '00.

This pamphlet distributed by City Lights Books in San Francisco is unpaginated, unillustrated except for the cover design, and originally sold for $.50. A postscript at the back gives a history of Chinese fables, beginning in the fourth and third centuries BC. The final page contains errata. There are sixty fables, two or three complete fables to a page, each with an attribution to author and era. One never needs to turn a page to finish a fable. None of these fables seem to be repeaters from the Western traditions that I know. Among my favorites are "The Good Man and the Wooden Image," the final line of which is "It is so easy to bully a good man!" Another is "How Not to Keep a Secret," which features a man who hides his treasure inside a wall with a sign saying that there is no treasure here. "Relativity" tells of a man who lost a sword overboard and so marked the place in the boat from which he dropped it! "The Fate of the Clever" presents a hunter who imitates animals' sounds in escalating fashion; to drive off the wolf, he imitates a tiger--only to attract a real tiger! In the end, a frustrated bear tears him apart. Finally, "The Compassionate Man" tells of a man who wants to have turtle soup but cannot bring himself to boil the turtle. He thus sets up a rod over a panful of boiling water and gives the turtle a chance at life by walking over the pan without falling in. When the turtle accomplishes the difficult feat, the man says "Bravo! Do it again!" Many parallel traditional Western fables. Thus "The Tiger's First Donkey" shows our "Familiarity breeds contempt" with creatures different from the fox and the lion. Then again, some fables set situations like ours but move in the opposite direction. So the lamb in "The Lamb in a Tiger's Skin" forgets his skin and runs away from a wolf whom he meets.

1960 The Cicada and the Ant (Russian). I.A. Krylov. Illustrator G. Nikolski. Pamphlet. My First Little Books. Printed in USSR. Moscow: State Publishing House for Children's Literature. $1 from Victor Kamkin Books, NY, April, '96.

This 16-page pamphlet for children contains Krylov's poetry for five fables: GA, "The Monkey and the Spectacles," "The Elephant and the Dog," FC, and FG. That is a great selection if one is allowed just five fables. Perhaps the strongest of the illustrations is of the monkey twirling the spectacles over his head (7).

1960 The Right Play for You. Bernice Wells Carlson. Illustrated by Georgette Boris. NY: Abingdon Press. $2.50, Sept., '91.

A simple pedagogical work for those who work with young people. How do you select, adapt, and alter a play? Aesop gives two of the first subjects dealt with: FG (23-24) as a subject involving good pantomime possibilities and SW (26-30) as one that allows for lots of action, including supplemental action by other actors than the principals. Once again, Aesop gets around.

1960 Treat Shop.  Eleanor M. Johnson and Leland B. Jacobs.  Illustrations by Tom Sinnickson.  New enlarged edition.  Hardbound.  Columbus, OH: Treasury of Literature -- Student Series:  Charles Merrill Books, Inc.  $11 from Syndi Bierman, Willow Grove, PA, through eBay, July, '16.

This colorful reader has a section "Animal Parade," Illustrated by Tom Sinnickson, that includes both TH (42) and TMCM (53).  Both are "retold from Aesop."  The hare's temptation in TH is a field of clover; after stopping to eat, he gets sleepy.  "The middle of ANY race is a foolish place to take a nap" (44).  TMCM features Tim and Herbert.  Their journey to town takes all night, and they sleep through the next day at Herbert's.  "Peace and quiet are sometimes worth more than cake and cheese" (55).  The art is just right for a kids' reader.  From the school district of Bristol, PA.  Good condition.

1960 Uncle Frank's Animal Stories. Scotia, NY:Americana Review. $1.50 from Knoxville, TN, April, '00.

The prologue introduces this reproduced booklet of twenty pages, 5½" x 8½", as having appeared in the 1870's. "Of Course," just past the halfway point in the booklet, might well qualify as a fable. Animals in the wood come across a boot and argue over what it may be. The bear says that it is a fruit rind, the wolf a nest, and the goat a long root. The old owl says that it is a boot, and the rest all dispute him vigorously. Then they force the owl to leave the wood. The owl's last words are "It is true for all that." Towards the end of the booklet one finds "How the Lion Loved the Dog," which is a version of Tolstoy's story, with Nero as the lion, Trot as the dog, and the London zoo as the venue. It is perhaps typical of this booklet that the story does not carry through to Trot's death.

1960 Various Fables from Various Places. Edited by Diane de Prima. With Original Illustrations by Bernard Krigstein. Hardbound. Dust jacket. Printed in USA. NY: Capricorn Books: G.P. Putnam's Sons. $10 from Robinart Booksearch, Philadelphia, through Interloc, May, '98.

This is an important anthology of fables. It is organized by geographic territories, fifteen of which are covered. In an epilogue "About Fables," di Prima mentions three factors that help shape the collection. Aesop is not heavily represented here, since we know Aesop well. Fable is hard to define, but she has had no problem proceeding on her "feel" for what is a fable. Above all, her criterion has been delight: "…these stories were chosen chiefly for the delight they gave me. The delight is mostly all I know about them." I find her anthology worthy of the company of such important traditional collections as Jerrold's Big Book of Fables (1912), the Everyman library edition (1913), Cooper's An Argosy of Fables (1921), Komroff's The Great Fables of All Nations (1928), and Barbara Hayes' Folk Tales and Fables of the World (1987). All eight Spanish fables here come from Cayetano Fernandez, and there is nothing from either Samaniego or Iriarte. All the Russian fables come from Krylov. La Fontaine has only three fables, perhaps for the same reason for which Aesop has only ten. Let me mention several among those that are new to me and good. The conceited monkey can find no one to praise her sufficiently, and so she humbly approaches the pig, who lacks all vanity. Whatever she says, the pig answers "Grum, grum" (Spain, 3). In the Gesta Romanorum (20), the story about testing one's wife with a lie about laying an egg becomes a story about voiding a crow! A weasel and hyena hunting encounter two men hunting. The weasel immediately hides. The hyena sees the men and thinks "Here is meat." The men see the hyena and think "Here is meat." The hyena and men kill each other, and the weasel comes out of his hole and thinks "Here is meat" (61). The toad bets the rat that he can do more than the rat (66). He walks through a crowd of men, who let him pass because they fear what touching him might bring. The rat tries to do the same and is promptly attacked. Among the best of the illustrations are those of the fox confessing to the wolf (130) and of the dancing apes (143). I wonder if there was a large-format publication of this book. It would do more justice to Krigstein's art.

1960 Various Fables from Various Places. Edited by Diane de Prima. With Original Illustrations by Bernard Krigstein. First paperback edition. A Putnam Capricorn Original. Printed in USA. NY: Capricorn Books: G.P. Putnam's Sons. $25 from Mary Ann Ryan, Bookseller, Portland, OR, through ABE, August, '00.

See my comments on the hardbound version. This paperback seems exactly identical within the covers. The back cover lists the fifteen geographic areas. The front cover offers a typical Krigstein illustration. This one features a tortoise talking into a human's ear.

1960 When Animals Talked: Fables from all over the World. Selected and retold by G.S. Whitehead. Illustrations by G. Berry and G.S. Dixon. Apparent first printing. Dust-jacket. Hardbound. Nottingham: Cultural Publications Limited. £ 1 from Bardic Books through abe, April, '11. 

This book has a strong musty smell! The book has a different -- and good! -- telling of the story of Renard, the bear, and the wood wedges: "Who Likes Honey?" (1-7). "Renard Turns Sheepdog" features the monkey and Renard as shepherds (8-13). This story is new to me. I also read the third story, which is a good extended story about the monkey and fox stealing King Lion's crown, robe, and scepter. They create a harsh and ugly government. King Lion returns to claim his throne, and the clever fox opens the castle to him, claiming to be his true servant. The Lion King uses his help, dismisses the monkey with some punishment and banishes the fox from the court ("The Sham King," 14-24). The fourth story is the "Chanticleer" story. There are several stories here that are typically Renardian: longer than normal fables but including fable material and strategems. Overall, there are nineteen stories, identified by the countries that they come from, including "Dixieland." I think I can perceive the differing styles of the two artists. Compare the illustrations on 10 and 15. I doubt that they came from the same hand. 

1960 Who Ben Kaputen Der Robin? Mein Grossfader's Rhymers Und Fable Tellen. By Dave Morrah. Drawings by the author. First edition. Dust jacket. Garden City: Doubleday. $3 at The Strand, April, '97. Extra copy for $20 at Old Children's Books, New Orleans, Aug., '88.

The germanizing gets old quickly, but there are clever turns on many of the fables: "The Rooster and the Pearl," AL, "The Sick Lion," LS, "The Cat and the Fox," "The Mountain and the Mouse," and "The Jackdaw and the Lamb." The best is "The Rabbits and the Frogs." The illustrations are good, e.g., for MM. This book would be worth people's chuckling over at an exhibition.

1960 99 fables by william march. Edited with an introduction by William T. Going. Illustrated by Richard Brough. First edition. Dust jacket. University, Alabama: University of Alabama Press. $10 at Jackson Street, Oct., '94.

This book represents a genuine surprise. After I have read so many books that promise fables but offer something else, here are real fables! William Edward March Campbell apparently worked over this collection for years and had it refused once by one of the publishers of his other works. Except for a very few that mention Aesop (#1, #97, and #98) and one that deliberately redoes his work (#30), the fables are original. Is it wrong to take #1 and #97 as programmatic? The former concludes "the fable is, and always had been, the platitude's natural frame" (2) and the latter has the Delphians killing Aesop in Going's words "not because of the warming of the oracle and not because his wit was too sharp and biting, but because he told fables--nothing but fables--and he was boring" (xviii). Going places March apart from Ade and Thurber, for his style is purposefully flat and folk-like, and totally apart from the allusive, decorative manner of La Fontaine and Gay. He places him rather with Bierce, for his fables are sharp and ironic (xvi-xvii). I find them tending overall more than I would want toward a scolding tone. But there is also a rich variety of humor, as when the escaped elephant admits that he has been too thin-skinned for life among humans (5). Typical and insightful is "The Peacock and His Bride," where the central character admits that what the two have in common is that "we both love me to distraction" (74). Let me list some other fables worth a special look: #29, 52, 53, 56, 57, 64, 71, 77, 84, and 88. Brough's work is often strong, e.g., on xxiv and 58.

1960/64 The Boy Who Cried Wolf. Retold by Katherine Evans. Illustrated by Katherine Evans. Second printing. Hardbound. Printed in USA. Chicago: Albert Whitman & Co. $12.50 from Wonder Book and Video, Frederick, MD, Feb., '02.

This presentation continues Evans' work with Whitman, found also in BS ('62/'66) and MM ('59). This telling of the story does a good job filling out concrete details. Young Peter lived with his poor grandfather, and all they owned was the flock of sheep. As shepherd, Peter looked down from the hill and saw people in the town active working, playing, fishing, and going to market. He ran down the hill and called "A wolf!" Everyone ran to the hill. When they arrived, he laughed and laughed and said it was all a joke. He played the trick successfully a second time a few days later. Not long afterwards, the wolf appeared. This time the town folk did not believe Peter. The wolf killed most of the boy's flock, and the other sheep ran away and were never seen again. The people of the town themselves utter the moral, that a liar will not be believed even if telling the truth. Alternating spreads of black-and-white and colored pages greet the reader.

1960/65 Story Wagon. The Prose and Poetry Series. By Marjorie Pratt and Mary Meighen. Revised by Floy Winks DeLancey. Illustrated by Carol Critchfield and Guy Brown Wiser Associates. Second edition. Syracuse: L.W. Singer: A Division of Random House, Inc. $5 at Half Price Books, San Antonio, August,'96.

The contents are significantly changed from the 1960 edition. I notice that several of the items that remain (including MSA) are still on the same pages: the printer is spared lots of work in changing or remaking plates. The cover has changed its color, illustration, and style. See also my copy of the teacher's edition for the same year.

1960/65 Story Wagon. Second Edition. Teacher’s Edition. By Marjorie Pratt and Mary Meighen. Illustrated by Carol Critchfield and Guy Brown Wiser Associates. The Prose and Poetry Series. Syracuse: L.W. Singer. $6.98 at Cheever Books, San Antonio, August, ’96.

See the first edition of the student’s edition in 1960. This book still has the enjoyable colored illustrations of MSA (84) and the great ending: "Now--the man always walks, the boy always walks, the donkey always walks." This edition adds plenty of suggestions to teachers in the blue pages at the very end of the book (50-54).

1960/66 Storyland Favorites. Harold G. Shane and Kathleen B. Hester. Illustrated by Mary Miller Salem. Hardbound. Printed in USA. River Forest, IL: Gateways to Reading Treasures Co-Basal Literary Readers: Laidlaw Brothers: Doubleday & Company. $12.95 from Donaldson's, San Antonio, August, '96.

This third printing has a new copyright (1966) and a non-pictorial cover different from the LM cover of my copy of the edition copyrighted in 1960. Laidlaw is now a division of Doubleday & Company. See my comments there.

1960/66 Storyland Favorites. Harold G. Shane and Kathleen B. Hester. Illustrated by Mary Miller Salem. 5th printing. Hardbound. River Forest, IL: Gateways to Reading Treasures Co-Basal Literary Readers: Laidlaw Brothers: Doubleday & Company. $4 from Half-Price Books, San Antonio, August, '96.

This fifth printing has a pictorial cover of LM. This may be the cleanest copy of the four copies of this book that are in the collection. Vintage 50's art that I like. Five fables. The mouse rides the lion's back out of the net as the hunters approach. "The Cat and the Milk" is their version of CP. SW makes the usual mistake about the bet, which proves who is better. Also TH and FC. 

1960/67 La Fontaine: Fables. Odette de Mourgues. Dust-jacket. Hardbound. London: Studies in French Literature #4: Edward Arnold. £2 from Waterfield's, Oxford, July, '90.

This is a short and helpful little work, perhaps too taken with literary history, but it certainly helps us to hear something about that in assessing La Fontaine. Unfortunately, frequent French passages are not translated. De Mourgues wants to situate La Fontaine in history: that is a hard task because he stands out. There seems to be little around him. "He wrote at the time when French poetry offered the maximum advantages from the point of view of technique and of poetic traditions and the maximum difficulties from the point of view of subject-matter, themes, imagery and vocabulary" (8-9). La Fontaine's particular quality is maturity. Precieux poetry was the one kind of poetry alive when La Fontaine was writing: "poetry written for a group of sophisticated people in order to give them a delicate intellectual pleasure, without any danger of upsetting the peaceful civilized atmosphere of the group" (14). "The study of man is the basic subject of the Fables" (17). La Fontaine accepted the limitations which his age set on subject-matter. "Plaire et instruire" is not as easy as it may seem! "In real life men behave like animals" (20). "There is no pity, no security anywhere" (22). "The image of man which emerges from the general picture is that of a deceitful, greedy and cruel being" (23). The moralist is not primarily concerned with practical teaching, but his purpose is to see men and society as they are. He is not a reformer but he need not be a cynic. A moralist is necessarily a pessimist. The picture of politics and society in La F remains a general one, going far beyond his age. He shows no indignation, no bitterness. We watch the tragedy of the world from the point of view of the gods. But to this La Fontaine adds a rich blend of sympathy, tenderness, and irony. One last value enters this mix: solitude. Plaire: The fables are stories and most critics of La F have viewed him primarily as a story-teller. A first obvious characteristic of his poetry and story-telling is its naturalness. A second is wit. And for him wit is associated with serious and important subjects. There is a long section on poetic sacrifice. La Fontaine leaves out a lot that he knows that the reader needs to supply. Something classic about saying more with less. Critical analysis then of OR and "The Rat and the Oyster." There is a lot here in 63 pages. 

1960/71 Young Years: Best Loved Stories and Poems for Little Children. Editor: Augusta Baker. Originally illustrated by various people, along with classical illustrations by famous artists. NY: Parents' Magazine Press. $8.95 at Black Star in Chicago, May, '89.

Twenty fables on 144-74 of a large book. The texts are apparently from Jacobs, who is referred to in the "Suggested Reading" on 503-8. They may be revised (see xvi). The illustrations are all blue-on-black; they are taken from various people, including Tenniel, Bennett, and Doré. Compare this book with the later edition of the same book.

1960/1973 Fables, Tales, and Stories/A Captive in the Caucasus. L.N. Tolstoi. Compiled and Adapted with Notes and Vocabulary by E. Vladimirsky and V. Zaitsev. Third edition. Paperbound. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House. $5 from Mauricette Magien, Pierrefonds, Quebec, Canada, through eBay, March, '03. 

Here is a third edition of this helpful little pamphlet, of which I already have a first edition. Pages 9-17 contain twelve "Fables and Tales," of which at least eight are Aesopic. The notes are helpful for identifying characters and stories. The limited vocabulary at the back is easier to work with than a whole dictionary. A nice little find. The earlier edition had been done by the Foreign Languages Publishing House; this edition is published by Progress Publishers. The earlier edition belonged to the Easy Russian Series; there is no indication that this publication belongs to a series.

1960/74 Aesop's Fables. Denison B. Hull. Decorations by Rainey Bennett. Paperbound. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. $1 from an unknown source, July, '81.

The decorations are just that There is no intent to involve narrative in the picture. The rhyming verses are pleasing and not overly long--e.g., on the 2W. It might be fun to work Babrius into a lecture as a particular kind of story teller. This copy, which sold for $1.95, was a fourth impression in 1974. See a more recent copy under "1960" for a different printing at a different price. 

1960/74 Le Roman de Renart: Fabliaux du Moyen Age. Adaptées par Jean Sabran. Illustrées par Guy Sabran. Paperbound. Paris: Collection Rouge et Bleue: Editions GP. $4.90 from Marie Gervais, St.-Urbain-Premier, Quebec, Canada, through eBay, Feb., '07.

I like Guy Sabran's visual style very much, and I am happy to encounter it here in Renard, as I had encountered it in GP's "Fables of La Fontaine" in 1952 and 1960. The book offers both full-colored partial-page illustrations and duochrome images. Two of the best of the full-colored illustrations occur at the beginning and near the end. The former of these is the title-page's presentation of Renard the pilgrim standing with a book "Ma Vie" in his arm and talking with two children. The latter image presents Renard's supposed funeral on 34. Renard's encounter with "Chantecler" is shown on 7. Renard lies apparently dead on the path on 17 and is being found by a travelling merchant with his wagon full of eels.

1960/74 Young Years: Best Loved Stories and Poems for Little Children. Editor: Augusta Baker. Various illustrators. Hardbound. Printed in USA. NY: Parents' Magazine Press. Gift of Claudia Spaulding, August, '90.

This 1974 edition seems to reproduce exactly the 1971 copy of the original 1960 edition. See my comments there.

1960/75? Young Years: Best Loved Stories and Poems for Little Children. Editor: Augusta Baker. Originally illustrated by various people, along with classical illustrations by famous artists. NY: Parents' Magazine Press. $8.00 at Claudette's, Brookdale Lodge, CA, Aug., '89.

Almost identical with, and in better shape than, the earlier version of the same book. The cover is slightly different; the title page is no longer garish. This one is boldly proclaimed the "latest version": not much help for bibliographers! Augusta Baker is now "Story Telling Specialist Emeritus." Contemporary artists are now acknowledged on xvi.

1960/76 Fiabe di La Fontaine. NA. Illustrazioni di Beniamino Bodini. III edizione completamente rinnovata. Hardbound. Milan: Gli Aristolibri: AMZ. $8.85 from Cinda Thompson, Vista, CA, through Ebay, Jan., '01.

This book largely reproduces, in both verbatim texts and exactly the same illustrations, Favole di animali: Fiabe di la Fontaine, Fedro e Esopo by the same publisher, which I have listed under 1960/80. See my comments there. This book adds several stories. The typeface seems new. The new stories here include LM, "L'aquila et lo scarabeo," "Il cavallo vendicativo," LS, "I generali dei topi," AD, "Il contadino et la serpe," TMCM, and "Il gatto furbo e un vecchio topo." "I generali dei topi" gets my prize for the best new illustrations (56 and 59). I am surprised how much I still enjoy Bodini's colorful and spirited illustrations.

1960/80 Favole di animali: Fiabe di la Fontaine, Fedro e Esopo. Illustrazione di Beniamino Bodini. Milan: AMZ. $6.25 in Rome, Sept., '83.

Colorful and often useful pictures. I like the one of the ant giving hell to the grasshopper. Good faces too on the fox with and moving away from the grapes. Style is simple but colorful, and the cut of the pictures allows them to be removed from text easily enough. Dog with meat is satisfactory.

1960? De Schildpad en de Haas. No author or artist indicated, but covers are signed by "Sabatés." Printed in the Netherlands. Serie Animados. $14.40 at Prince and Pauper, San Diego, Aug., '93.

Large-format pamphlet that includes "Alice in Wonderland." Some delightful children's art, especially for the early views of an angry and exhausted turtle. Curiously, there is no illustration of the rabbit sleeping. After the race, a disrobed victor turtle enjoys relaxing on top of his shell.

1960? Deutsche Fabeln. Auswahl und Bearbeitung von Willy Schüssler. Zeichnungen von Grothe. Hardbound. Naumburg-Saale: UTA-Jugendbücher Band 1: UTA-Verlag. See 1949?/60?.

1960? Die Schönsten Fabeln aus Aller Welt. Ausgewählt und bearbeitet von Waltraut Henschel-Villaret. Illustrationen von Mouche Vormstein. Hardbound. Gütersloh, Germany: Bertelsmann Reinhard Mohn OHG. Gift of André Salem, July, '08.

This book works by geography, presenting first German fables, then European, African, Oriental, Persian, Asian, and Indian, in that order. The author is named after his or her individual work. There is an extensive T of C at the beginning. The frequent illustrations by Vormstein include both colored and black-and-white. The illustrations are vigorous! For TMCM, the book turns to Martin Luther, and Vormstein offers a lively interaction of two feminine mice (10). On this reading I tried and enjoyed both text and pictures for "Johann, der Seifensieder" by Friedrich von Hagedorn (11). It is a fine redoing of La Fontaine's "The Banker and the Shoemaker." Prose and verse are both well represented. This is the third time recently that I have encountered Goethe's "Die Frösche" (30), here with a delightful colored two-page illustration. Among many pleasing illustrations, I am struck by the colored illustration for La Fontaine's "The Rat Who Retired from the World" (107). Here the rat holds a rosary as he sends the pleading feminine rat off empty-handed. Another strong illustration is FS on 151. Finally, there are two fine illustrations for FM (274-77). This book is a treasure for its range, its selections, and its illustrations. Thank you, André!

1960? Es Sprach der Alte Marabu: 12 Lustige Fabeleien von Cefischer. Bilder und Verse von Cefischer. Frankfurt am Main: Heinrich Cobet Verlag. DM 3 at Buchkaiser, Pforzheim, July, '95.

Simple cartoon-plus-rhyme stories each covering two pages. Generally there are three pictured phases and then a six line lesson from the wise bird. The donkey thinks he can become a zebra just by having painted stripes; the mouse gets away from the cat only to run into a mouse-trap; the cow wants the two flowers beyond her reach but will not accept them when they are given to her. Even though each of these stories is somehow new, they all seem to play with standard fable themes and strategies. Might Cefischer be C.E. Fischer? It is very hard to judge the age of this book. I found it on the way to the train station in my brief time in Pforzheim.

1960? Fabeln. Georg Rath. Hamburg: Hans Christians Verlag. $10 from Melvin McCosh, Aug., '94.

Fifty verse fables, about one to a page. I read the first ten and found them good but not a major contribution to the fable tradition. The best of these ten are perhaps "Die Zwei Hunde" (9), "Der Taler und der Penny" (13), and "Der Knabe und die Fliege" (15). I have checked all my German references and resources and can find no reference to Rath. And this booklet seems one of the most "undatable" of all the books I have. The author has published poetry through a publisher in Omaha! There is a T of C at the end.

1960? Fables de La Fontaine. Illustrations de Guy Georget. Paris: Éditions du Pélican Blanc. $8 at Second Story, DuPont Circle, April, '97.

A happy find! I had laid it on the desk, and a woman after me wanted it very much. Sorry! These are some of the best simple colored-art responses to LaFontaine that I have seen in a while. Fifteen fables, each with one or two pieces of perhaps four-color art. They remind me somewhat of Hellé. One favorite of mine is WL. I still find it hard to believe that I found this lovely book for eight dollars!

1960? Fables de la Jungle. Dr Paul White, Traduit de l'anglais par Mia Denéréaz. Illustrations de Graham Wade. Paperbound. Vennes-Lausanne: Collection Ligue pour la lecture de la Bible. $1.99 from Daleann Erksson, Yellville, AR, through eBay, April, '04. 

Twelve years after I found the original English, I have now found this French translation. And the price is right! Here is some of what I wrote then about the English, which I have listed under "1955/66": "Clever stories heavy-handedly moralized for Christian teaching. For example, a great wall (sin) suddenly appears in the jungle and separates animals from their best feeding territory. A silly monkey chases a coconut into quicksand. Another feeds vultures (bad thoughts) but tells them to go away; of course more vultures return the next day. Yet another chops off a branch while he is perched on it! Two of the cleverest stories are II and III. In the former, a hunter makes a small opening in the top of an oil can and fills the can with rocks and a few peanuts on top of them. His monkey victim will not let go once he gets his fist around a few of the peanuts, and the heavy can becomes his trap. He is clubbed and bagged. In III, a snake has been slithering into the coop through a small hole in the wall to swallow an egg and then break it inside himself as he slithers back out. The clever owner replaces a fresh egg with a hard-boiled one, and the snake is trapped when he reaches the opening. The snake is killed."

1960? Kleine Fabeln.  Kurt Hubbuch.  Illustriert von Rudolf Grundemann.  Hardbound.  Stuttgart: Organisationsbüro Hubbuch.  €11.80 from Antiquariat Buch-Mars, Herner, Germany, through ZVAB, Jan., '16.

This is apparently a gift of a German company still operating in Stuttgart.  I have found another book by Hubbuch on the web from 1964, and so I guess at the date.  This booklet offers four fables of three to ten pages each, with spirited brown illustrations shaped around the rhyming texts.  Only right-hand pages are printed with text or cartoons.  "Der Floh" tells the story of an elephant that foolishly accepted the request of a home made by a flea.  The flea settled in his ear and drove him crazy, literally running in circles, right up to the day when that weak ear occasioned his being shot by hunters.  "No mercy for fleas!"  "Der Rabe und der Spatz" presents a crow that thinks too long about why a particle of bacon lies beneath the branch on which he sits.  While he thinks, a sparrow flies away with the bacon.  "Die Fliege" tells of a young fly that needs to experience for himself the threats his father has outlined from abstract knowledge.  The first spider's web gets him.  "Der Frosch Quak-Quak" is for me the best of the lot.  Quak-Quak has to do everything better than all the other frogs.  In concert, he needs to sing louder, and that means drawing in more and more breath.  Hubbuch has Quak-Quak ending where the tradition had that other frog ending, who had heard of a large animal….  This little book is not in Bodemann.  It is fun.

1960? La Fontaine 'den Hikayeler. Paperbound. $5 from Ugur Yurtuttan, Etiler, Istanbul, Turkey, Dec., '03.

This is the simplest of paperback books, with 64 pages and a slightly smaller number of fables. The cover has some simple orange monochrome illustrations of various animals and people. I am trusting that this really is a fable book!

1960? Russian Folk Tales. Introduced (and edited?) by E. Pomerantseva. Illustrated by T.A. Mavrina and K.V. Kuznetsov. Various translators. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House. $6.30 from Booksource, Ltd., Swarthmore, PA, through ABE. Extra copy without dust jacket for $2.50 at The Lantern, DC, Oct., '90.

A straightforward collection of Russian folktales. "Fox and Crane" (29) is straight Aesop. "Fox and Wolf" (25) is traditional Renard material. "Axe Porridge" (50) is a version of "Stone Soup." All three are translated by Bernard Isaacs. Simple black and white illustrations.

1960? The Dog and His Shadow: Aesop Fables (Hebrew). Izza. Hardbound. Tel Aviv: Amichai Press. $25 from Abraham Madeisker, Jerusalem, through eBay, July, '04. 

This is one of two Hebrew books found at the same time on eBay. They are roughly similar to Little Golden Books in the USA. For me, the outstanding feature of each lies in the three full-page colored illustrations. Here those picture FS (11), a cat with mice (23, perhaps BC?), and a crow with a mussel (37). There are also nine smaller black-and-white illustrations along the way. From the pictures, I recognize other familiar stories among the twelve presented in this book. These include "The Rich Man and His Friend" (7), "The Woodsman and His Axe" (16), "The Rich Woman and Her Youth" (19), AD (28), "Buried Treasure" (30), GGE (33), "The Apple Tree" (40), and BS (44). There is a T of C at the beginning.

1960? The Fable of Fat Fanny or What Could Happen to You If You Don't Stick to Your Diet! Dean Norman. Hardbound. Cleveland: The Sunbeam Library: American Greetings. $0.99 from K & S Pentz, Montgomery, PA through eBay, Dec., '10.

This is a small hardbound book of twenty pages about 4¼" x 4¾". It is inscribed "To Barry From a secret admirer." The title-page changes the sub-title to: "If you have trouble sticking to your diet, maybe this story will give you inspiration." Fat Fanny starts as an egg on a blade of grass. The egg hatches and starts eating. Soon she is a big fat centipede-like blob. Others tease her, saying things like "Your mother must have been a dirigible." Fanny decides on a crash diet and spins herself into a cocoon. When Fat Fanny hatches out of her cocoon, she is a gorgeous butterfly. The cartoon here may be the only X-rated cartoon of a butterfly that I have seen! I never thought of a butterfly's body as having breasts! Here comes the shock of this little book. When one turns the page, one reads "Then a bird ate her." "Moral: Better to eat like a bird than to be eaten by one." I notice that there is a different -- updated? -- version of this booklet now for sale on the web with a date of 1974. It has a different cover. We will see if I get it.

1960? The Fox, the Hare, and the Rooster: A Russian Folk Tale. Translated by Tom Botting. Designed by V. Andriyevich. Pop-up. Paperbound. Moscow: Malysh Publishing House. Canadian $4.99 from Susan Alexander, Toronto, through eBay, Feb., '09.

This pop-up book is in very good condition. Is this good folktale really a fable? It was labeled "Aesop's Fable" in the eBay description. Rooster can do what neither dog nor bear can do: get the squatter fox -- whose home made of ice has melted -- out of hare's warm wooden house. Simple art and nice paper-work!

1960? The Lion Grown Old. Text after Jean de La Fontaine. Illustrations by Jean Giannini. Pamphlet. Printed in Italy. Brighton: Litor Publishers. $3 from Pierre Cantin, Chelsea, Quebec, Canada, Feb., '01.

This sixteen-page pamphlet about 7" x 7½" has lively illustrations inside covers that show a good deal of wear. From the title-page on, the lion has a pince-nez that is slipping off of his nose. He acquires bandages on his paws and body as he goes along. At last he faces the ass and says "I wanted to die. But to suffer your blows is double death." This fable is not presented very frequently. I am surprised to see it get its own booklet here.

1960? The Tortoise and the Hare. Illustrations by Sabatés. Paperbound. London: Sandle's. £12.50 from Unicorn Books, Pinner, UK, August, '02.

Here is a large-format pamphlet that reproduces the fable part of a Dutch version, De Schildpad en de Haas, for which I have guessed a publication year of 1960. As I mention there, it features delightful children's art, especially for the early views of an angry and exhausted turtle. I cannot say whether the English version is the same as the long Dutch prose story, but at least having this English text helps now to make sense of the pictures and to answer the questions I had then about what seemed an unusual presentation of the story. In this English version, there are two tortoises. The "disrobed victor turtle" who "enjoys relaxing on top of his shell" is not really yet a victor. It is, as this version makes clear, "another tortoise who looked exactly like Tubby." He appears along the route. Thus a part of an element from another fable, usually told between a hare and a porcupine, shows up here; there many porcupines are used to confuse the hare, while one substitute appears here. In this version, Horace the hare thought "If slow old Tubby has time to rest then I will, too!" And so he went to sleep. Several illustrations from the fuller Dutch version are skipped here. As I suggest, they may complicate the story further. 

1960? The Wild Donkey: Aesop Fables (Hebrew). Izza. Hardbound. Tel Aviv: Amichai Press. $25 from Abraham Madeisker, Jerusalem, through eBay, July, '04. 

This is one of two Hebrew books found at the same time on eBay. They are roughly similar to Little Golden Books in the USA. For me, the outstanding feature of each lies in the three full-page colored illustrations. Here those picture TMCM (7), LM (33), and an eagle dropping a tortoise (41). There are also seven smaller black-and-white illustrations along the way. From the pictures, I recognize some of the other familiar stories among the nine presented in this book. These include TB (14), "The Miser" (18), MSA (21), "The Larks and the Farmer" (26), and "The Farmer and the Noble" (35). Maybe I am missing something, but the T of C at the beginning seems to overlook MSA! It lists only eight stories.

1960? The Wolf Who Sang Songs. Boris Zakhoder. Translated from the Russian by Avril Ryman. Drawings by V. Chizhikov. Moscow: Progress Publishers. $1 at Holland's Books, Portland, March, '96.

This large-format pamphlet contains three stories. "Why the Cock Crows Thrice" shows that the cock crows because he still wants his beautiful tail back from the peacock who stole it. "The Fox's Ruling" is a variation of the "Show me how it was done" tale, only now with the snake as the villain and the fox as the clever "judge" that helps the peasant. Then it adds the fox's demand for a gift, which turns out to be two dogs in a sack. "The Wolf Who Sang Songs" may be related to the fable about the wolf who played for the goat's last dance. Here the wolf's singing brings the townfolk. Lively art, especially in the two-page title spreads for each story.

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1961A Children's Treasury of Folk and Fairy Tales. Edited and adapted by Eric Protter. Introduction by Martha Foley. Illustrated by many people. Great Neck: Channel Press. $3.50 at Constant Reader, March, '88.

A beautiful book in very good shape. Three Aesopic stories appear: "The Raven and the Fox," "The Thief and the Donkey" (with a Doré illustration), and "The Peasant and the Waterman," also with an illustration. Otherwise a wonderful collection of story and art.

1961 A Greek Reader for Schools adapted from Aesop, Theophrastus, Lucian, Herodotus, Thucydides, Zenophon, and Plato. Edited with Introductions, Notes, and Vocabularies by C.E. Freeman and W.D. Lowe. Hardbound. Oxford: Clarendon Press. See 1917/61.

1961 A Hundred Fables from La Fontaine. The English by Philip Wayne. First U.S. edition. Paperback. Garden City: Anchor Books: Doubleday & Company. $2 at Jackson Street Booksellers, July, '93. Extra copy for $1.50 from Jackson Street earlier.

Good short introduction. "La Fontaine's lighthearted manner is, in a way, a veil to his scope and depth. This poet saw and loved lasting essentials, whether in a bowed woodman or in a rabbit or in death." His intelligence is coupled with gaiety, his irony with compassion. I find Wayne's verse translations faulty, perhaps because I have read too many student papers that find things in the English not there in the French. A careful study of the first four of Wayne's fables finds regular additions, perhaps prompted by the rhythm and rhyme. Thus calling the grasshopper the ant's "friend" in I,1.17 is dangerous. In I,2.3-4, there is nothing in the French about "delicate flair" or a "fair" greeting. In I,3 it takes Wayne's frog twenty-one words to burst as against LaFontaine's ten. In I,5 Wayne's wolf adds a gratuitous and potentially distracting line in the midst of his rejection of the dog's feasts: "You have 'em. You grow fatter." T of C at the beginning, and AI at the end.

1961 Aesop Without Morals. Lloyd W. Daly. Illustrated by Grace Muscarella. First printing. Dust jacket. NY: Thomas Yoseloff. $8.10 from Booklegger's, May, '89. Also three copies of the smaller second printing with a red cover (one for $6.50 from Harold's, St. Paul, June, '95; another a gift of Vera Ruotolo, July, '91; the last for $9.50 from St. Croix, March, '94) and five copies of the third printing with its tan cover, including one work copy.

One of the best sources for straight fables. Daly uses Perry as his basis for translation. Simple black-and-white ink sketches. AI. Quite comprehensive. A worthwhile book.

1961 Aesop's Fables. Translated by John Warrington. Illustrated by Joan Kiddell-Monroe. First edition. London: J.M. Dent & Sons/NY: E.P. Dutton & Company. £29 from Robin Greer, Nov., '94.

A beautiful edition distinctive for its green, blue, orange or tan two-tone art, a specimen of which appears on every page except 15 and 71. Some samples of very good illustration occur on 46, 85, 108, and 114. Perhaps 75% of the fables have morals, which seem to me particularly intelligent. Some good examples include "Figures are not facts" for "The Widow and the Hen" (8), "There is as much malice in a wink as in a word" for "The Fox and the Woodman" (31), "Disclaim one defect, and betray another" for "The Mole and her Mother" (49), and "Better scare than snare a thief" for "The Farmer and the Lion" (110). The appropriate morals are all the more surprising because "These fables have been translated into the plain, straightforward English of today from the Greek and Latin texts of Babrius, Phaedrus and other ancient or medieval writers to whom we owe their preservation," the translator's note on the back of the title page accurately proclaims. In terms of form, there are a few exceptions to a rule of "one or two fables per page." On three pairs of pages (76-77, 134-35, and 152-53) there is one fable with two illustrations. AI at the front of the book. Maybe 240 fables in all. Not listed in Hobbs.

1961 Appearances: Fables & Drawings. Russell Edson. Pamphlet. Printed in USA. Thing Press. $15 from Book Stop Used Books, Tucson, AZ, Nov., '01.

I had experienced Edson in his What a Man Can See from 1969. See my comments there. Here earlier he apparently does his own art work. I am still at a loss as to how to comprehend most of the work here. Several items seem to approach being stories, and so to qualify as fables. "Stew" (15) is a delightful piece about a woman who falls into a pot. Her husband ends up jumping in saying "I can get in stew too." "The Courtship" (23) evokes a man's hopes of appearing and being noticed and accepted by the person who looks afar from her window. Windows, doors, and walls recur frequently in this work.

1961 Belling the Tiger. Mary Stolz. Pictures by Beni Montresor. NY: Harper and Row. $1 at Amaranth, Evanston, Sept. '91. Extra copies for $3 from Milwaukee Public Library, Summer, '86, for $.95 from Downtown Books, Milwaukee, Nov., '92, and for $1 from Pageturners, Dec., '92.

A delightful kids' picture book. It is a kind of "second-generation" literature that actually quotes the Aesopic fable. Two mice end up belling a tiger and scaring an elephant and come home stronger mice for it all. No pictures worth considering.

1961 Fabeln und Parabeln von Äsop bis Brecht. Herausgegeben von Grete Ebner- Eschenhaym. First printing. Dust jacket. Leipzig?: Im Insel-Verlag. $4 at Imagination, Feb., '92. Extra copy without dust jacket for DM 8 by mail from Revers Buchhandlung, Sept., '95.

A hidden treasure sitting in the "Collectible" section of a favorite bookstore. In the midst of a delightfully broad and understandably heavily German spectrum of fabulists, I find the selection here surprising. Aesop is represented with five fables, Babrius with three, Phaedrus with two. Lessing has twenty-seven, LaFontaine nineteen, Pestalozzi fifteen, and Gellert fourteen. Krylov (nine), Krasicki (four), and Leonardo (two) give some international representation. No English or Spanish fabulists are represented. The short overview on 183-5 notes that the twentieth-century fable (e.g., from Brecht) has moved toward parable and takes its images from the human world. Alphabetical register by authors (with works) on 186. The extra copy, though lacking a dust jacket, is in superior condition, especially in its paper. Thus I keep it in the collection.

1961 Fables de La Fontaine

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